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Diogenes Laërtius quotes the chronicle of Apollodorus of Athens as saying that Thales died at the age of 78 during the 58th Olympiad (548–545 BC) and attributes his death to heat stroke while watching the games.Diogenes Laërtius states that "according to Herodotus and Douris and Democritus", Thales' parents were Examyes and Cleobuline, both wealthy and distinguished phoenicians, and then traces the family line back to Cadmus, a mythological Phoenician prince of Tyre.Diogenes then delivers conflicting reports: one that Thales married and either fathered a son (Cybisthus or Cybisthon) or adopted his nephew of the same name; the second that he never married, telling his mother as a young man that it was too early to marry, and as an older man that it was too late.Plutarch had earlier told this version: Solon visited Thales and asked him why he remained single; Thales answered that he did not like the idea of having to worry about children.

In mathematics, Thales used geometry to calculate the heights of pyramids and the distance of ships from the shore.He is the first known individual to use deductive reasoning applied to geometry, by deriving four corollaries to Thales' Theorem.The dates of Thales' life are not exactly known but are roughly established by a few datable events mentioned in the sources.According to Herodotus (and as determined by modern methods), Thales predicted the solar eclipse of May 28, 585 BC.He is the first known individual to whom a mathematical discovery has been attributed.

In mathematics, Thales used geometry to calculate the heights of pyramids and the distance of ships from the shore.

He is the first known individual to use deductive reasoning applied to geometry, by deriving four corollaries to Thales' Theorem.

The dates of Thales' life are not exactly known but are roughly established by a few datable events mentioned in the sources.

According to Herodotus (and as determined by modern methods), Thales predicted the solar eclipse of May 28, 585 BC.

He is the first known individual to whom a mathematical discovery has been attributed.

The current historical consensus is that Thales was born in the city of Miletus around the mid 620s BC from Phoenician parents, although some historians say he was a Phoenician who emigrated to Miletus with his parents.