North american indian dating

23-Apr-2016 02:27

• Introduction • North American Indian Art • Early Woodland Art • Late Woodland Art • South-East American Indian Cultures • The Art of the Plains • South-West and Far West • North-West • Native American Indian History Timeline • National Museum of the American Indian • Institute of American Indian Arts • Collections The discovery of the American continent in the 15th century brought Europeans into contact with cultures whose peoples practised a way of life and an ancient art stabilized millennia before, sometimes living under Neolithic conditions well into modern times.

The North American Indian was primarily a hunter and food gatherer.

His way of life was bound to conflict with the new settlers from Europe, whose agricultural enclosures drove the Indian from his home ground.

For too many 19th century Americans living in the large cities and towns of the east coast, the nearest they got to native American art was the pictures of Frederic Remington (1861-1909) - the famous portrayer of the Cowboy West - and the frontier landscapes of Thomas Cole (1801-48), George Caleb Bingham (1811-1879), Frederic Edwin Church (1826-1900), and Albert Bierstadt (1830-1902).

To appreciate the nature of the tribal art of the Indian peoples of North America, one has to visualise cultures in which daily life, religious belief and artistic expression are not seen as separate activities but as communal rituals, celebrating either the power of nature and supernatural forces or some essential human activity such as hunting.

It is difficult for men to appreciate the culture and art of a bitter enemy, and for most of the history of North America the settler was in a state of perpetual warfare against the Indian, until the latter was almost destroyed both physically and culturally.

The settlement of North America is perhaps the most complete in history, and the crafts of the native Indian inhabitants have only really become appreciated as the culture that produced them is dying.

His way of life was bound to conflict with the new settlers from Europe, whose agricultural enclosures drove the Indian from his home ground.

For too many 19th century Americans living in the large cities and towns of the east coast, the nearest they got to native American art was the pictures of Frederic Remington (1861-1909) - the famous portrayer of the Cowboy West - and the frontier landscapes of Thomas Cole (1801-48), George Caleb Bingham (1811-1879), Frederic Edwin Church (1826-1900), and Albert Bierstadt (1830-1902).

To appreciate the nature of the tribal art of the Indian peoples of North America, one has to visualise cultures in which daily life, religious belief and artistic expression are not seen as separate activities but as communal rituals, celebrating either the power of nature and supernatural forces or some essential human activity such as hunting.

It is difficult for men to appreciate the culture and art of a bitter enemy, and for most of the history of North America the settler was in a state of perpetual warfare against the Indian, until the latter was almost destroyed both physically and culturally.

The settlement of North America is perhaps the most complete in history, and the crafts of the native Indian inhabitants have only really become appreciated as the culture that produced them is dying.

Gradually with the cultivation of maize, nomadic hunting communities became settled agricultural ones, and the making of effigies, pipes and other cult objects became distinctive elements in a diverse culture that spread along the eastern seaboard area of North America known as the woodlands.