Chat with dominant female

26-Jul-2015 05:19

They tend to have a rather animated and lively way of talking, with very pronounced variations in vocal pitch and much more exchange of emotion in speech.

The connective tissue in women’s groups is the divulging of personal and sometimes intimate information about the life and the relationships of the speaker and other people.

Women are likely to look for common ground when they are talking with other women and tend to produce overlapping remarks in conversations.

Those were initially misdiagnosed as interruptions, but it turns out that women tend to like to help each other tell stories — some people have called it coauthoring.

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Salon spoke with Locke over the phone about sexual stereotypes, the “Real Housewives” franchise and the future of speech in the digital age.

So what are the differences between male and female speech?

But, according to a new book, there’s a far simpler reason for these linguistic differences: biology. Locke, a professor of linguistics at Lehman College and the author of “Eavesdropping: An Intimate History,” argues that men and women have radically different ways of speaking not because of their upbringing, but because they have radically different evolutionary needs.

Men, he argues, use antagonistic speech, or “duels,” to show off their strength and prove themselves to women.

Over the past few decades, linguists have shown that, when it comes to speech, many gender stereotypes hold remarkably true: Men tend to speak loudly, while women whisper; men talk over each other, while women conspire behind each other’s backs; men hold back their feelings, while women lay them out to strangers they meet on the subway.

Salon spoke with Locke over the phone about sexual stereotypes, the “Real Housewives” franchise and the future of speech in the digital age.So what are the differences between male and female speech?But, according to a new book, there’s a far simpler reason for these linguistic differences: biology. Locke, a professor of linguistics at Lehman College and the author of “Eavesdropping: An Intimate History,” argues that men and women have radically different ways of speaking not because of their upbringing, but because they have radically different evolutionary needs.Men, he argues, use antagonistic speech, or “duels,” to show off their strength and prove themselves to women.Over the past few decades, linguists have shown that, when it comes to speech, many gender stereotypes hold remarkably true: Men tend to speak loudly, while women whisper; men talk over each other, while women conspire behind each other’s backs; men hold back their feelings, while women lay them out to strangers they meet on the subway.According to some critics, these differences are merely a reflection of our cultural presuppositions about gender.